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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Feb 2018 right left

   

Snowdrop Strolls

Thursday 1st February
Rowallane Garden
Normal Admission, Members Free

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Snowdrop Walks

Saturday 3rd February
Springhill, Moneymore
Normal Admission Members Free

Snowdrop Walks

Saturday 3rd February
The Argory, Moy
Normal Admission Members Free

Path Edging and Bird Count

Saturday 3rd February
Comber Greenway
Free

Pond Improvement

Sunday 4th February
Rea’s Wood Antrim
Free

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Rethinking Engagement – A Dialogue Approach

Wednesday 7th February
Holywell Diversecity Community Partnership Building, 10–12 Bishop St, Derry

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NI Science Festival 2018

Thursday 15th February
Various, see website for details
See website for details

Brexit, Climate and Energy Policy

Thursday 15th February
Arthur Cox, Ten Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2
Free

16

Nest Fest

Saturday 17th February
Springhill, Moneymore
Normal Admission, Members Free

Woodland walk at Breen Forest on Glenshesk Road

Saturday 17th February
Breen Forest on Glenshesk Road
Free

Scrub Clearance

Sunday 18th February
Slievenacloy Nature Reserve, Belfast Hills
Free

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Priorities for Transport Infrastructure in Northern Ireland

Tuesday 20th February
Radisson Blu Hotel, The Gasworks, 3 Cromac P lace, Ormeau Road, Belfast
See website for details

21

Water Northern Ireland Conference 2018

Thursday 22nd February
Crowne Plaza Belfast, 117 Milltown Road, Shaw’s Bridge, Belfast BT8 7XP
Contact connor@nienvironmentlink.org for details

Shifting Shores Wave 2 seminar

Thursday 22nd February
Olympic Suite, Titanic Belfast

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Grassroots Social Event in Belfast

Saturday 24th February
TBC
Free

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Freshwater

Water is an essential natural resource that plays a vital role in maintaining biodiversity, our health and well–being and economic development. Sustainable water management delivers water quality, flood abatement, climate change mitigation, landscape and wildlife and provides valuable recreational and aesthetic benefits to residents and visitors to Northern Ireland.

Freshwater

The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), through river basin management planning, establishes an integrated and holistic approach to sustainable water use, balancing social and economic factors with the need to protect and improve our water environment. Progress with the delivery of river basin management plans in Northern Ireland is fundamental; currently 70% of our water bodies fail to reach good ecological status which, if not addressed, will lead to significant financial and environmental costs in the future. 

NIEL provides a secretariat service to the Freshwater Task Force which represents a range of organisations working together to ensure that Northern Ireland protects and improves freshwater ecosystems, actively promotes the sustainable management of our freshwater resources and fully implements the Water Framework Directive.

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Currently less than 30% of our water bodies are of sufficient quality to meet the requirements of The European Water Framework Directive.

The Northern Ireland River Basin Management Plans report that only 21% of water dependent protected areas are in favourable status and 11% have not been assessed.

It is estimated that there are some 120,000 septic tanks in Northern Ireland. While a properly installed and maintained septic tank system is not likely to have any adverse impact on the environment, it is estimated that at least 12,000 septic tanks are not in possession of necessary discharge consents.

Northern Ireland Water supplies 619 million litres of water every day and treats 134 million m³ of wastewater each year. On average we each use approximately 150 litres a day with about 95% of the water delivered to our homes going down the drain.

We already use 70% more water today than we did 40 years ago.

River monitoring is carried out routinely against national standards for the Water Framework Directive (WFD). Almost one quarter (23%) of monitored river waterbodies were of at least a ‘good’ standard in 2011, compared to 22% in 2010.

There are 21 lake waterbodies in Northern Ireland, that is lakes with an area of greater than 50 hectares. In 2011, as in 2010, five of the 21 lake waterbodies in Northern Ireland were classified as ‘good’, while 16 lake waterbodies were classified as ‘moderate’, ‘poor’ or ‘bad’.

Compliance for private sewage was 78% in 2011 compared to 88% in 2010. For trade effluent compliance there has been a steady increase from 76% in 2001 to 91% in 2011.

In 2011, 19% of all substantiated water pollution incidents in Northern Ireland were considered to be of ‘High’ or ‘Medium’ severity; the same as the 2010 level.