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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Sep 2017 right left

    

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Coca–Cola Coast Care Awards, Live Here Love Here are calling for you to nominate your Coastal and Inland Waterway Hero!

Friday 1st September

Castlerock Walk Fest

Saturday 2nd September
Downhill Demesne and Hezlett House
N/A

Car Bazaar

Saturday 2nd September
Mount Stewart
Car £5, Van £10, Trailer £15

Autumn Book Fair at The Argory

Saturday 2nd September
The Argory, Moy
Normal Admission, Members Free

Bushcraft for Beginners

Saturday 2nd September
Tollymore Field Studies Centre
£35 including a packed lunch

Rea’s Wood – Removal of Sycamore Trees in Wet–woodland

Sunday 3rd September
Rea’s Wood Antrim
Free

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Ards Beach Cleaning

Saturday 9th September
Strangford Lough meet at Portaferry
No Charge

NI Environment Week – Benburb Castle

Saturday 9th September
Benburb Castle
Free

NI Environment Week – Picnic with nature at Creggan Country Park

Saturday 9th September
Creggan Country Park

NI Environment Week – The Park After Dark – Creggan Country Park

Saturday 9th September
Creggan Country Park

NI Environment Week – Walk on the wild side – Creggan Country Park

Saturday 9th September
Creggan Country Park

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NI Environment Week – Brexit: The Future of the Environment in NI

Monday 11th September
Lough Neagh Discovery Centre
Free

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NI Environment Week – Batty about bats!

Wednesday 13th September
Rathfern Community Centre, Knockenagh Avenue, Carnmoney

NI Environment Week – Get your hands dirty!

Thursday 14th September
Various
Free

NI Environment Week – Creggan Heritage Trail for 50+ groups

Thursday 14th September
Creggan Country Park

NI Environment Week – Power from the Planet – Creggan Country Park

Friday 15th September
Creggan Country Park

Hedge Fun

Saturday 16th September
Minnowburn
No Charge, Donations Welcome

Wildlife Tracking

Saturday 16th September
Tollymore Field Studies Centre
£45 including lunch

NI Environment Week – Food from the Hills, Colin Allotments Healthy Living Centre

Saturday 16th September
Colin Allotments Healthy Living Centre
£5 per person (Belfast Hills Friends discounted rate of £3)

MCS Beachwatch

Sunday 17th September
Murlough NNR
No Charge

Foraging for Wild Foods and Medicine

Sunday 17th September
Tollymore Field Studies Centre
£40

Killard Point near Strangford – Beachwatch

Sunday 17th September
Killard Point
Free

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Blue Opportunities: The Marine Economy in the NPA

Thursday 21st September
Marine Institute, Rinville West, Oranmore, Galway
Free

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Jazz in the Garden at Mount Stewart

Sunday 24th September
Mount Stewart
Normal Admission, Members Free

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Brexit: Debating the Way Forward for Agriculture and the Environment in Northern Ireland

Friday 29th September
CAFRE, Greenmount Campus, 45 Tirgracy Rd, BT41 4PS
Free

Red Squirrel Day

Saturday 30th September
Mount Stewart
Normal Admission, Members Free

Tea Blending

Saturday 30th September
Rowallane Garden
Normal Admission, Members Free

Freshwater

Water is an essential natural resource that plays a vital role in maintaining biodiversity, our health and well–being and economic development. Sustainable water management delivers water quality, flood abatement, climate change mitigation, landscape and wildlife and provides valuable recreational and aesthetic benefits to residents and visitors to Northern Ireland.

Freshwater

The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), through river basin management planning, establishes an integrated and holistic approach to sustainable water use, balancing social and economic factors with the need to protect and improve our water environment. Progress with the delivery of river basin management plans in Northern Ireland is fundamental; currently 70% of our water bodies fail to reach good ecological status which, if not addressed, will lead to significant financial and environmental costs in the future. 

NIEL provides a secretariat service to the Freshwater Task Force which represents a range of organisations working together to ensure that Northern Ireland protects and improves freshwater ecosystems, actively promotes the sustainable management of our freshwater resources and fully implements the Water Framework Directive.

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Currently less than 30% of our water bodies are of sufficient quality to meet the requirements of The European Water Framework Directive.

The Northern Ireland River Basin Management Plans report that only 21% of water dependent protected areas are in favourable status and 11% have not been assessed.

It is estimated that there are some 120,000 septic tanks in Northern Ireland. While a properly installed and maintained septic tank system is not likely to have any adverse impact on the environment, it is estimated that at least 12,000 septic tanks are not in possession of necessary discharge consents.

Northern Ireland Water supplies 619 million litres of water every day and treats 134 million m³ of wastewater each year. On average we each use approximately 150 litres a day with about 95% of the water delivered to our homes going down the drain.

We already use 70% more water today than we did 40 years ago.

River monitoring is carried out routinely against national standards for the Water Framework Directive (WFD). Almost one quarter (23%) of monitored river waterbodies were of at least a ‘good’ standard in 2011, compared to 22% in 2010.

There are 21 lake waterbodies in Northern Ireland, that is lakes with an area of greater than 50 hectares. In 2011, as in 2010, five of the 21 lake waterbodies in Northern Ireland were classified as ‘good’, while 16 lake waterbodies were classified as ‘moderate’, ‘poor’ or ‘bad’.

Compliance for private sewage was 78% in 2011 compared to 88% in 2010. For trade effluent compliance there has been a steady increase from 76% in 2001 to 91% in 2011.

In 2011, 19% of all substantiated water pollution incidents in Northern Ireland were considered to be of ‘High’ or ‘Medium’ severity; the same as the 2010 level.