Cookie Policy

We use cookies to make our website effective and useful for you. To continue, please accept the use of cookies.

I accept

How we use cookies

Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Jan 2022 right left

     
01
02
03
04
05
06

Care Farming for Mental Health

Friday 7th January
Online
£50

08
09

DfC Covid Recovery Programme 2022 Information session (1)

Monday 10th January
Online
Free

Weird and wonderful winter moths

Monday 10th January
Online
free for Ulster Wildlife members and £3.00 for non–members

11

DfC Covid Recovery Programme 2022 Information session (2)

Wednesday 12th January
Online
Free

Next steps for decarbonising UK heat and heat networks – expansion, buildings decarbonisation, consumer protection, and policy and regulatory priorities

Thursday 13th January
Online
£190 plus VAT

14
15
16

QUB Winter School: Sustainability Summit

Monday 17th January
Online
Free

SUPER–G project on “Improving Permanent Grasslands for ecosystem services and biodiversity”

Monday 17th January
Online
Free

Sustainable seafood and how you can help

Monday 17th January
Online
free for Ulster Wildlife members and £3.00 for non–members

Environment Ireland

Tuesday 18th January
CROKE PARK, Dublin
See website for details

Sustainable Tourism with Esther Dobbin from The National Trust

Wednesday 19th January
Online
Free

Energy Efficiency in the Home

Wednesday 19th January
Online
Free

Ireland’s Wintering Waterbirds Webinar

Wednesday 19th January
Online
Free

20

HERoNI: 30 years of Historic Environment Record NI , The Story So Far

Friday 21st January
Online
Free

Climate Bar Symposium: Towards a Model Environmental Law (Cóir Dlí an Chomhshaoil)

Friday 21st January
Online
Free– £50

22
23

SUSTx Sustainability Summit & Business Community

Monday 24th January
Online
Free

Leave No Trace Awareness Course (Tollymore)

Tuesday 25th January
Tollymore National Outdoor Centre
£35 / €40

The geodiversity of Northern Ireland: the greatest story of our time

Tuesday 25th January
Online
Free

Climate Change: what it means for Northern Ireland and what we can do

Wednesday 26th January
Online
free for Ulster Wildlife members and £3.00 for non–members

Energy Efficiency in the Home

Thursday 27th January
Online
Free

28
29
30

Sustainable Carbon Cycles

Monday 31st January
Online

     

Freshwater

Water is an essential natural resource that plays a vital role in maintaining biodiversity, our health and well–being and economic development. Sustainable water management delivers water quality, flood abatement, climate change mitigation, landscape and wildlife and provides valuable recreational and aesthetic benefits to residents and visitors to Northern Ireland.

Freshwater

The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), through river basin management planning, establishes an integrated and holistic approach to sustainable water use, balancing social and economic factors with the need to protect and improve our water environment. The general objective of the WFD is to achieve ‘Good Ecological Status’ (GES) for all rivers, lakes and marine waters by 2021. Delivery of the WFD in NI is divided into three distinct River Basin Districts. Approximately 37% of surface waters are of sufficient quality to meet the requirements of the WFD.

Diffuse pollution from farm, road, residential and commercial run–off contributes directly to aquifers, rivers, lake and wetland contamination. Given that agriculture is a major source of diffuse pollution in Northern Ireland, this sector is key to identifying and delivering potential solutions.

NIEL provides a secretariat service to the Freshwater Task Force which represents a range of organisations working together to ensure that Northern Ireland protects and improves freshwater ecosystems, actively promotes the sustainable management of our freshwater resources and fully implements the Water Framework Directive.

Read More

The Northern Ireland River Basin Management Plans report that only 21% of water dependent protected areas are in favourable status and 11% have not been assessed.

It is estimated that there are some 120,000 septic tanks in Northern Ireland. While a properly installed and maintained septic tank system is not likely to have any adverse impact on the environment, it is estimated that at least 12,000 septic tanks are not in possession of necessary discharge consents.

Northern Ireland Water supplies 619 million litres of water every day and treats 134 million m³ of wastewater each year. On average we each use approximately 150 litres a day with about 95% of the water delivered to our homes going down the drain.

We already use 70% more water today than we did 40 years ago.

River monitoring is carried out routinely against national standards for the Water Framework Directive (WFD). Almost one quarter (23%) of monitored river waterbodies were of at least a ‘good’ standard in 2011, compared to 22% in 2010.