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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Feb 2019 right left

    
01

Snowdrop Walks

Saturday 2nd February
The Argory Moy
Normal Admission

Woodland Management – Saintfield Estate

Sunday 3rd February
Saintfield Estate
N/A

04
05
06

Public Money for Public Goods – Benefits for farmers, rural communities and the environment

Thursday 7th February
Seamus Heaney Centre, 45 Main Street, Bellaghy BT45 8HT
Free

08
09
10
11
12

Tackling Food Waste: Protecting the Environment and Helping Society

Wednesday 13th February
De Vere Holborn Bars, 138–142 Holborn, London
See website for details

14
15

Nest Fest

Saturday 16th February
Springhill, Moneymore
Normal Admission

Path & Hedge Maintenance

Sunday 17th February
Bog Meadows Nature Reserve, Belfast
N/A

18
19

CEDaR Recorders Days – Belfast

Wednesday 20th February
Ulster Museum, Belfast
Free

21

Dry Stone Walling

Friday 22nd February
Drumnaph Nature Reserve
Free (lunch provided)

Evening Social Event in Belfast

Saturday 23rd February
Belfast
N/A

24
25

Countryside Educational Visits Accreditation Scheme (CEVAS) Training (Therapeutic route)

Tuesday 26th February
Bradkeel Social Farm, Plumbridge, County Tyrone BT79 8BN 307
£240 inc VAT

27

Irish Conference 2019 Wading into Water: The Assessment and Management of our Aquatic Environment

Thursday 28th February
Radisson Blu, Athlone
CIEEM Member (Fellow, Full, Associate, Graduate) £125.00 CIEEM member (Qual or Retd) £75.00 CIEEM Student Member £30.00 Non Member Ticket £175.00 Student (not a CIEEM member) £50.00

BITC Charity Learning Network

Thursday 28th February
Arthur Cox, Victoria House, 15–17 Gloucester St, Belfast
£295 + VAT

  

Ecosystem services

Natural Capital can be defined as the stock of natural assets which include geology, soil, air, water and all living things. These natural assets, provide the life support systems (ecosystem services) upon which we all depend.

Ecosystem services

It is from this Natural Capital that we derive a wide range of services, often called ecosystem services, which make human life possible. The most obvious and important ecosystem services include the food we eat, the water we drink, the fresh air we breathe, and the plant materials we use for fuel, building materials and medicines. There are also many less visible ecosystem services such as:

  • Climate regulation and natural flood defences provided by forests
  • Flood management and water purification services provided by wetlands
  • Carbon sequestration (storage) services provided by peatlands
  • Pollination of crops by insects.

Other services include the leisure, recreational, tourism, cultural and physical and mental health and wellbeing benefits of nature including, amongst others, the opportunity to walk up a mountain or along a beach, or cycle through a forest, each of which will also have direct and indirect financial benefits. 

Natural capital underpins our well–being and economic prosperity, providing multiple benefits to society, yet it is consistently undervalued in decision–making. 

Natural capital accounting is considered integral to the delivery of
DEFRA’s 25 Year Environment Plan
. Natural capital assessments have been championed as an efficient, practical and readily understandable approach to supporting more effective policy and investment decisions.

Read More

UK woodland provided the equivalent of £5.6 billion of ecosystem services in 2014.

The value of a tree standing provides around 30 times more in recreational benefit and carbon and pollution removal, than it would provide if cut down for timber.

The introduction of the grey squirrel in the 19th century is one of the best known examples of invasion by an invasive species. It has the ability to carry the squirrel pox virus which is lethal to our native red squirrels.

Floating pennywort, one of the most invasive aquatic plants, was first detected in Northern Ireland in 2002.

Invasive alien species are estimated to cost the Northern Irish economy an estimated £46.5million per year.

Even though peatlands only cover 3% of the global land area, they contain approximately 30% of all the carbon on land, equivalent to 75% of all atmospheric carbon and twice the carbon stock in the global forest biomass.

Coastal wetlands in the USA are estimated to currently provide US$23.2 billion per year in storm protection services alone.

Wise use of wetlands, including the conservation and restoration of hydrological functions, is essential in maintaining an infrastructure that can help meet a wide range of policy objectives.

Some wetland areas can play important roles in flood mitigation and thereby provide an important regulating ecosystem service, since approximately 2 billion people live in high flood risk zones.

64% of lakes in Northern Ireland are eutrophic or hypertrophic.

Functioning ecosystems contribute billions of pounds to the UK economy – however, ecosystem services are not given consideration in standard financial assessments.

Pollination of Northern Ireland’s apple trees, primarily by honey bees, is worth over £7 million per year; pollination of other fruits and vegetables is worth an additional £100,000 per year.

The UK’s population is predicted to grow by nearly 10 million in the next 20 years; this is likely to increase pressures on ecosystem services in the future.

Approximately 2 billion people in the world live in high flood risk zones.

Drainage for agriculture or forestry turns peatlands from a carbon sink to a carbon source. CO2 emissions from peatland drainage, fires and exploitation are approximately 3 billion tonnes per year, which equates to more than 10% of the global fossil fuel emissions.