Cookie Policy

We use cookies to make our website effective and useful for you. To continue, please accept the use of cookies.

I accept

How we use cookies

Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

May 2018 right left

 
01

Community Places Free Planning Advice

Wednesday 2nd May
Community Places, 2 Downshire Place, Belfast BT2 7JQ
Free

03
04
05

Dry Stone Walling

Sunday 6th May
Mourne Mountains
Free

07

Belfast Roadshow on Sustainable Development Goals

Tuesday 8th May
Herbert Smith Freehills LLP, 3 Cromac Quay, Ormeau Gasworks, Belfast BT7 2JD
Free

Sustainable NI Carbon Management Training

Wednesday 9th May
Parliament Buildings, Belfast
See above

10
11

An Evening Walk in Spring

Saturday 12th May
Belfast Area
Free

Guided bluebell walk at Prehen Wood

Sunday 13th May
Prehen Wood, Derry~Londonderry
Free

14
15
16
17
18

Bluebell Stroll with the Ranger

Saturday 19th May
Murlough NNR
No Charge, Donations Welcome

Glenoe Geology Walk

Saturday 19th May
Glenoe Waterfall
No Charge, Donations Welcome

Gilford Castle, Gilford Village, Co Armagh – Historic Garden Restoration

Sunday 20th May
Gilford Castle, Gilford Village, Co–Armagh
Free

21
22

Carbon Management Course

Wednesday 23rd May
Inspire Business Park, Newtownards
£225 (No VAT to pay)

24
25
26

Country Fair

Sunday 27th May
Florence Court
Normal Admission Members Free

Jazz in the Garden at Mount Stewart

Sunday 27th May
Mount Stewart
Normal Admission Members Free

Cruise the Lough

Monday 28th May
Crom
Adult £4, Child £2

29
30
31
  

Climate change

Climate change is one of the most challenging global issues facing Northern Ireland and requires response from all parts of government to both mitigate and adapt to ensure the resilience of Northern Ireland. 

Climate change

Flooding, sea level rise and extreme weather have significant impacts on communities, infrastructure and businesses. The timeline of these events and the millions spent repairing the damage across Northern Ireland over the last decade demonstrates that we need to take resilience and adaptation to climate change seriously.

The Climate Change Act 2008, which extends to Northern Ireland, established a legislative framework for the UK to reduce its GHG emissions by 80% from 1990 levels by 2050 and by 34% by 2020. The current NI Executive Programme for Government has set a target of a GHG reduction of at least 35% by 2025.

The Northern Ireland Climate Change Adaptation Programme was launched in January 2014, highlighting primary areas for adaptation action in Northern Ireland – flooding, water, natural environment, agriculture and forestry.

Infrastructure does not always mean hard engineering (though we support appropriate hard engineering solutions). Green and Blue infrastructure will be equally important, and in some cases more important, for delivering sustainable solutions for Northern Ireland – for recreation and active travel, for flood alleviation and sustainable drainage. 

NIEL is funded by DAERA to provide support to Climate Northern Ireland, a project which operates to widen the understanding and knowledge of the impacts of climate change within Northern Ireland and promotes the adaptation actions necessary to deal with it. The group consists of representatives from central and local government, the business community, the voluntary sector and professional organisations. Follow this link to the Climate Northern Ireland website to find a wealth of resources dealing with climate change.

NIEL also provides a secretariat service to the NI Climate Adaptation Network, a group of environmental and development NGOs encouraging the Northern Ireland Assembly to introduce a Climate Change Bill for Northern Ireland.

Read More

Climate change exacerbates the risk that non–native species (including pests and pathogens) may establish and spread.

Some habitats are particularly vulnerable to climate change; the risks are clearest for montane habitats (to increased temperature), wetlands (to changes in water availability) and coastal habitats (to sea–level rise).

According to the International Energy Agency, the global breakdown for CO2 emissions is as follows: Residential (6%), Other (10%), Industry (20%), Transport (22%) Electricity and heat (41%).

According to the Climate Change Act 2008, the net UK carbon account for the year 2050 must be at least 80% lower than the 1990 baseline.

By 2050, Northern Ireland will have: An increase in winter mean temperature of approximately 1.7 °C; an increase in summer mean temperature of approximately 2.2°C; changes in winter mean precipitation of approximately +9%; changes in summer mean precipitation of approximately –12%; and sea level rise for Belfast of 14.5cm above the 1990 sea level.

Carbon dioxide emissions from domestic combustion sources are estimated to account for 23.4% of the Northern Ireland CO2 total.

Even though peatlands only cover 3% of the global land area, they contain approximately 30% of all the carbon on land, equivalent to 75% of all atmospheric carbon and twice the carbon stock in the global forest biomass.

According to the International Energy Agency, the global breakdown for CO2 emissions is as follows: Residential (6%), Other (10%), Industry (20%), Transport (22%) Electricity and Heat (41%).