Cookie Policy

We use cookies to make our website effective and useful for you. To continue, please accept the use of cookies.

I accept

How we use cookies

Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Dec 2019 right left

      

Tree Maintenance

Sunday 1st December
Gilford Castle, Gilford Village, Co Armagh
Free

Placemaking for a Healthier Belfast

Monday 2nd December
Assembly Buildings, 2–10 Fisherwick Place, Belfast
Free

The UKERC project OverCoME (Overcoming Conflict in Marine Energy)

Monday 2nd December
Waterfront ICC Belfast

Visitor Safety Group Managing Informal Mountain Bike Trails Workshop

Tuesday 3rd December
Tollymore National Outdoor Centre, Newcastle
Free

The Role of Energy Storage in a Sustainable Future

Tuesday 3rd December
CREST – Centre for Renewable Energy & Sustainable Technology – SWC, Lough Yoan Road, Enniskillen BT74 4EJ

Building cyber resilience for small organisations

Wednesday 4th December
NICVA, 61 Duncairn Gardens, Belfast BT15 2GB

NIEL AGM 2019

Thursday 5th December
RSPB’s Window on Wildlife, 100 Airport Road, Belfast
Free

06
07
08

How wild is wild? Rewilding the island of Ireland

Monday 9th December
W5, 2 Queens Quay, Belfast BT3 9QQ
£5.98 – £9.21

BES Science Slam 2019

Tuesday 10th December
The Black Box, 18–22 Hill Street, Belfast BT1 2LA
£10

CFC Carbon Quiz – BES Annual Meeting Social Event

Wednesday 11th December
ICC Belfast, 2 Lanyon Place, Belfast BT1 3WH

12
13

Making Environmentally Friendly Christmas Decorations

Saturday 14th December
South Belfast
Free

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
    

Climate change

Climate change is one of the most challenging global issues facing Northern Ireland and requires response from all parts of government to both mitigate and adapt to ensure the resilience of Northern Ireland. 

Climate change

Flooding, sea level rise and extreme weather have significant impacts on communities, infrastructure and businesses. The timeline of these events and the millions spent repairing the damage across Northern Ireland over the last decade demonstrates that we need to take resilience and adaptation to climate change seriously.

The Climate Change Act 2008, which extends to Northern Ireland, established a legislative framework for the UK to reduce its GHG emissions by 80% from 1990 levels by 2050 and by 34% by 2020. The current NI Executive Programme for Government has set a target of a GHG reduction of at least 35% by 2025.

The Northern Ireland Climate Change Adaptation Programme was launched in January 2014, highlighting primary areas for adaptation action in Northern Ireland – flooding, water, natural environment, agriculture and forestry.

Infrastructure does not always mean hard engineering (though we support appropriate hard engineering solutions). Green and Blue infrastructure will be equally important, and in some cases more important, for delivering sustainable solutions for Northern Ireland – for recreation and active travel, for flood alleviation and sustainable drainage. 

NIEL is funded by DAERA to provide support to Climate Northern Ireland, a project which operates to widen the understanding and knowledge of the impacts of climate change within Northern Ireland and promotes the adaptation actions necessary to deal with it. The group consists of representatives from central and local government, the business community, the voluntary sector and professional organisations. Follow this link to the Climate Northern Ireland website to find a wealth of resources dealing with climate change.

NIEL also provides a secretariat service to the NI Climate Adaptation Network, a group of environmental and development NGOs encouraging the Northern Ireland Assembly to introduce a Climate Change Bill for Northern Ireland.

Read More

Climate change exacerbates the risk that non–native species (including pests and pathogens) may establish and spread.

Some habitats are particularly vulnerable to climate change; the risks are clearest for montane habitats (to increased temperature), wetlands (to changes in water availability) and coastal habitats (to sea–level rise).

According to the International Energy Agency, the global breakdown for CO2 emissions is as follows: Residential (6%), Other (10%), Industry (20%), Transport (22%) Electricity and heat (41%).

According to the Climate Change Act 2008, the net UK carbon account for the year 2050 must be at least 80% lower than the 1990 baseline.

By 2050, Northern Ireland will have: An increase in winter mean temperature of approximately 1.7 °C; an increase in summer mean temperature of approximately 2.2°C; changes in winter mean precipitation of approximately +9%; changes in summer mean precipitation of approximately –12%; and sea level rise for Belfast of 14.5cm above the 1990 sea level.

Carbon dioxide emissions from domestic combustion sources are estimated to account for 23.4% of the Northern Ireland CO2 total.

Even though peatlands only cover 3% of the global land area, they contain approximately 30% of all the carbon on land, equivalent to 75% of all atmospheric carbon and twice the carbon stock in the global forest biomass.

According to the International Energy Agency, the global breakdown for CO2 emissions is as follows: Residential (6%), Other (10%), Industry (20%), Transport (22%) Electricity and Heat (41%).