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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Nov 2017 right left

  
01
02

Storytelling by the Fire

Friday 3rd November
Florence Court
Adult £15

Autumn Garden Walk

Saturday 4th November
Mount Stewart
Adult £10, Child £5

Jo’s Walks — The building of Murlough: Part 1

Saturday 4th November
Murlough NNR, Keel Point, Dundrum entrance
No Charge, Donations Welcome

05

Changing Landscapes: Protecting the environment in a new Europe

Monday 6th November
Dynamic Earth, Edinburgh

Heritage Angel Awards 2017 – Featuring ‘Heritage in Song’!

Tuesday 7th November
Grand Opera House, Belfast BT12 4GN
Free

ESRC Festival of Social Science – SMEs meeting the climate change challenge

Tuesday 7th November
110 Victoria Street, Belfast BT1 3GN
See website for details

08

Key issues for energy policy in Northern Ireland: security of supply, the single energy market and the future for renewables

Thursday 9th November
TBC, Belfast
See website for details

The Future of the UK Environment: delivering health and wellbeing over the next 25 years

Thursday 9th November
Aston University, Birmingham
See website for details

10

BTO NI Conference

Saturday 11th November
Lough Neagh Discovery Centre
see above

Path Maintenance & Scrub Control

Sunday 12th November
Bog Meadows Nature Reserve Belfast
Free

13
14
15
16

How GDPR will impact your organisation

Friday 17th November
Rural Community Network, 38a Oldtown Street, Cookstown, Co. Tyrone BT80 8EF
Free

Innovative Learning using GIS, ICT and Fieldwork

Saturday 18th November
Tollymore Field Studies Centre
£45 including lunch

Have a go: Dry Stone Walling

Saturday 18th November
Strangford Lough
No Charge, Donations Welcome

Creative Writing Workshop

Saturday 18th November
Mount Stewart
£19

Family Festive Film Fun

Saturday 18th November
Rowallane Garden
Normal Admission, Members Free

19
20

UK Farming and the Environment Post–Brexit

Tuesday 21st November
TBC, Central London
See website for details

BRICK Workshop 33, Hillsborough Castle

Tuesday 21st November
Hillsborough Castle
£19, bursaries available

22

ASCENT Workshop

Thursday 23rd November
Tollymore National Outdoor Centre, 32 Hilltown Road, Bryansford, Newcastle
Free

24

NIEA Conference on Water Framework Directive – Future Partnerships

Saturday 25th November
College of Agriculture Food & Rural Enterprise (CAFRE), Greenmount Campus, 45 Tirgracy Road, Antrim BT41 4PS
Free

Crafted

Saturday 25th November
Castle Ward
Normal Admission, Members Free

Hedge Maintenance

Sunday 26th November
Gilford Castle, Gilford Co Armagh
Free

World Forum on Natural Capital 2017

Monday 27th November
Edinburgh International Conference Centre, Edinburgh
See website for details

Scrub Clearance & Conserving the Cryptic Wood White Butterfly

Monday 27th November
Lough Neagh Discovery Centre
Free

28

Action Renewables Energy Association – Hydrogen Economy Seminar

Wednesday 29th November
The Doyen, 829 Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7GY
See website for details

30
  

Biodiversity

Biodiversity in Northern Ireland sits within a broader international context, notably the Convention on Biological Diversity which came into force over 20 years ago and its associated targets and the EU 2020 Biodiversity Strategy.

Biodiversity

One of the aims of the Northern Ireland Biodiversity Strategy (DoENI, 2014) was to halt biodiversity loss by 2016.  A review conducted by the Northern Ireland Biodiversity Group (2009) reported that “progress has been made with the processes and mechanisms of halting biodiversity loss” but “there is little hard evidence that the deterioration of Northern Ireland’s biodiversity is actually slowing down”.  This is supported by the State of the Environment report (Northern Ireland Environment Agency, 2013).

Pressures on biodiversity in Northern Ireland stem from multiple factors including climate change, land abandonment, infrastructure development, invasive species and agricultural intensification.

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Examples of invasive alien species include Japanese knotweed, floating pennywort and Zebra mussels.

To date the Northern Ireland Environment Agency has declared a total of 360 Areas of Special Scientific Interest, 6.7% of the NI land mass, 104,861 acres, with an ambition to declare 440 by 2016.

Some habitats are particularly vulnerable to climate change; the risks are clearest for montane habitats (to increased temperature), wetlands (to changes in water availability) and coastal habitats (to sea–level rise).

There is strong evidence that climate change is already affecting UK biodiversity. Impacts are expected to increase as the magnitude of climate change increases.

There are currently 65 U.K. Priority Habitats, with 51 of these in Northern Ireland.

There are currently 481 Priority Species in Northern Ireland.

Since the 1950s, 41,000 hectares of countryside has been lost to urban development, with an unquantified loss of biodiversity.

The total land area of Northern Ireland is 14,160 km2 (1,416,000 ha). Approximately 6.6% of the land area of Northern Ireland is designated as ASSI for nature conservation, including earth science interest.

The total area of sea (below mean low water) which had been designated by the end of 2005 is estimated at 26,032 ha. This figure includes an area of open sea (approx. 1,095 ha) of Strangford Lough Marine Nature Reserve which is not covered by any other designation.

The rate of habitat and biodiversity loss has slowed and protection has increased with over 100,000 hectares declared as Areas of Special Scientific Interest.

Over two–thirds (708) of 1,031 features assessed within areas of special scientific interest in Northern Ireland are in a favourable condition.

Between 1994/95 and 2010/11 the total wetland bird population is estimated to have decreased by 23%. Coastal populations declined by 4% while freshwater populations declined by 54%.

Adult common seal populations at Strangford Lough have fluctuated over recent years, but the 2012 adult population of 202 was above the average for the last ten years (199). The highest population recorded at Strangford Lough in the last ten years (288) was recorded in 2003.