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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

May 2019 right left

  

The Smart and Green Building Show

Wednesday 1st May
Premier Publishing Ltd, Unit 51, Park West Entrprise Centre, Park West, Dublin 12
Free

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Tiger Who Came to Tea

Friday 10th May
Rowallane Garden
Normal Admission

NI Social Farms & Gardens Annual Forum 2019

Saturday 11th May
The Duncairn Centre, Duncairn Avenue, Belfast BT14 6BP

Knockbracken Allotments, South Belfast – Path Renovation

Sunday 12th May
Knockbracken Allotments South Belfast
Free

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An Evening Walk at a Scenic Location in the Belfast Area

Saturday 18th May
TBC
Free

Shared Heritage – Legacies of the First World War

Saturday 18th May
Various, see flyer for details

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BioBlitz – Camphill Community Glencraig

Friday 24th May
Camphill Community Glencraig, 4 Seahill Road, Holywood BT18 0DB
Free

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Moyola Waterfoot Nature Reserve – Himalayan Balsam Control

Sunday 26th May
Moyola Waterfoot Nature Reserve
Free

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Free Environmental Skills Training Course for Undergraduate Students

Tuesday 28th May

Free

Launch of the NBN Atlas Northern Ireland

Wednesday 29th May
Ulster Museum Belfast
Free

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Biodiversity

Biodiversity in Northern Ireland sits within a broader international context, notably the Convention on Biological Diversity which came into force over 20 years ago and its associated targets and the EU 2020 Biodiversity Strategy.

Biodiversity

One of the aims of the Northern Ireland Biodiversity Strategy (DoENI, 2014) was to halt biodiversity loss by 2016. A review conducted by the Northern Ireland Biodiversity Group (2009) reported that “progress has been made with the processes and mechanisms of halting biodiversity loss” but “there is little hard evidence that the deterioration of Northern Ireland’s biodiversity is actually slowing down”. This is supported by the State of the Environment report (Northern Ireland Environment Agency, 2013).

Pressures on biodiversity in Northern Ireland stem from multiple factors including climate change, land abandonment, infrastructure development, invasive species and agricultural intensification.

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Examples of invasive alien species include Japanese knotweed, floating pennywort and Zebra mussels.

To date the Northern Ireland Environment Agency has declared a total of 360 Areas of Special Scientific Interest, 6.7% of the NI land mass.

Some habitats are particularly vulnerable to climate change; the risks are clearest for montane habitats (to increased temperature), wetlands (to changes in water availability) and coastal habitats (to sea–level rise).

There is strong evidence that climate change is already affecting UK biodiversity. Impacts are expected to increase as the magnitude of climate change increases.

There are currently 65 U.K. Priority Habitats, with 51 of these in Northern Ireland.

There are currently 481 Priority Species in Northern Ireland.

Since the 1950s, 41,000 hectares of countryside has been lost to urban development, with an unquantified loss of biodiversity.

The total land area of Northern Ireland is 14,160 km2 (1,416,000 ha). Approximately 6.6% of the land area of Northern Ireland is designated as ASSI for nature conservation, including earth science interest.

The rate of habitat and biodiversity loss has slowed and protection has increased with over 100,000 hectares declared as Areas of Special Scientific Interest.