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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Aug 2021 right left

      
01

Climate Conference Series 2021 – Until UN COP26

Monday 2nd August
Online
See website for details

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15

Advising for Sustainable Food Production as an Island

Monday 16th August
Online
Free

Open Local Government: South–West NI Workshop

Tuesday 17th August
Online
Free

18

Open Local Government: Ards & North Down and Lisburn & Castlereagh Workshop

Thursday 19th August
Online
Free

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23

Open Local Government: North–East NI Workshop

Tuesday 24th August
Online
Free

25

Open Local Government: South–East NI Workshop

Thursday 26th August
Online
Free

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Transport

The private car continues to dominate day–to–day travelling in Northern Ireland, with 73% of our journeys being made by car. Public transport and active travel infrastructure is crucial to delivering sustainable solutions for connected infrastructure across Northern Ireland.

Transport

A better integrated transportation system has the potential to help economic prosperity and health and well–being through improved connectivity, reduced congestion, improved journey time and reliability, and increased accessibility.

A dispersed rural settlement pattern combined with Belfast being the primary employment hub in Northern Ireland, places considerable stress on the main transport corridors. Therefore public transport is essential for tackling endemic car dependency which amongst other benefits, will help improve air quality. Other global cities have banned certain cars from entering the city on certain days, increased parking prices, reduced the price of public transport, introduced toll roads, extended pedestrianised areas and adopted light rail/tram systems. 

Investment and expenditure is still disproportionately orientated towards roads–based measures. Investment in public transport here is just half the proportion of that in England, Scotland and the Republic of Ireland. Whilst recent investment in public transport has produced encouraging results in Northern Ireland, much more should be done.

This continued over–reliance on the private car has an increasingly negative impact on Northern Ireland’s environment. Transportation currently accounts for approximately 25% of man–made greenhouse gas emissions here and it is also the sector which continues to experience significant increases in emissions.

NIEL provides a secretariat service to the Transport Working Group, which meets when required to advocate shared policy positions and advocate a more sustainable approach to transport in Northern Ireland.

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Between 2013 and 2014, diesel use increased by 3.3%, whereas petrol use decreased by 2.0%.

The prevalence of driving to work is highest amongst residents of rural constituencies, notably Strangford, Mid Ulster and North Antrim, and lowest in Belfast, particularly Belfast West and Belfast North.

Ten per cent of Northern Ireland residents aged 16 to 74 who were in employment worked mainly at or from home. A further 7.7 per cent usually walked to work, while 4.8 per cent travelled by bus, and 1.3 per cent by train. 3.4 per cent used other methods.

Residents living in rural constituencies were more likely than their urban counterparts to work from home.

58 per cent of people aged 16 to 74 years who were in employment usually drove a vehicle to work. A further 10 per cent were members of a car or van pool, while 4.9 per cent usually travelled to work as a passenger in a car or van.

On average, Northern Ireland residents travelled 5,888 miles per year.

The longest average journeys lengths were on Northern Ireland Railways (20.8 miles), although we only made an average of 5 of these per person per year.

GHG emissions from the Transport sector in NI have increased by 26% despite improvements in efficiency of transport vehicles, as a result of strong growth in transport demand and increased affordability of cars.

65% of transport emissions come from cars.