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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Dec 2017 right left

    
01

Christmas Fair at The Argory

Saturday 2nd December
The Argory, Moy
Normal Admission, Members Free

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Air Pollution in the UK Post–Brexit – Tackling air pollution and delivering a cleaner, greener and healthier future for the UK

Tuesday 5th December
TBC, Central London
See website for details

NIEL AGM 2017 & GDPR Information Session

Wednesday 6th December
Window on Wildlife (WOW), Belfast
Free

Santa’s Magical Kingdom at The Argory

Thursday 7th December
The Argory, Moy
Adult £7 Child £15

Navigating the Future – Inland Waterways Development

Thursday 7th December
Waterfront Hall, Belfast
See flyer for details

Fermanagh Choral Society Christmas Concerts

Friday 8th December
Castle Coole
Adult £15

Yuletide Market at Rowallane

Saturday 9th December
Rowallane Garden
Normal Admission, Members Free

Have a go: Coppicing

Saturday 9th December
Strangford Lough
No Charge, Donations Welcome

Magical Christmas

Saturday 9th December
Castle Coole
Adult £5, Child £15

Belfast’s First Repair Café

Saturday 9th December
Farset Labs, Belfast
Free

Path Maintenance & Scrub Control

Sunday 10th December
Balloo Wetland & Woodland, Bangor
Free

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Dec out your Gingerbread Man

Saturday 16th December
Rowallane Garden
Normal Admission, Members Free, Donations Welcome

Christmas Social Event

Sunday 17th December
Members House
N/K

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Sustainable development

Sustainable development is wide–ranging and cross–cutting in nature. It is generally defined as ‘development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’.

Sustainable development

Seen as the guiding principle for long–term global development, sustainable development consists of three pillars: economic prosperity, social development and environmental protection.

The Earth Summit in 1992 served to secure commitment from governments to the concept of sustainable development and highlighted the issues surrounding it on a global stage. The European Union Sustainable Development Strategy was published in 2001 with six objectives – to tackle climate change; natural resource protection; sustainable transport; ageing population; public health and the global dimension of sustainable development.

The Northern Ireland Sustainable Development Strategy was first published in 2006 and later revised in 2010. It sets the overarching agenda for achieving the shared prosperity of Northern Ireland and its people without impacting disproportionately upon our natural environment. Since 2007 District Councils in Northern Ireland are obliged to act in a way that will contribute to the achievement of sustainable development through a statutory duty.

Twenty years after the Earth Summit, where countries adopted Agenda 21, the UN Conference on Sustainable Development Rio+20, took place in 2012 to secure renewed political commitment for sustainable development, assess the progress to date and the remaining gaps in the implementation and address new and emerging challenges. The Conference focused on two key themes: (a) a green economy in the context of sustainable development poverty eradication; and (b) the institutional framework for sustainable development.

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More than $513 billion mobilized in commitments for sustainable development, including in the areas of energy, transport, green economy, disaster reduction, desertification, water, forests and agriculture.

692 voluntary commitments for sustainable development registered by governments, business, civil society groups, universities and others.

The global population is projected to rise from 7 billion (current) to 9 billion by 2050.

One in five people on this planet, or over 1 billion people, still live in extreme poverty

One in seven people – or 14% of the world’s population is undernourished.

Global demand for natural resources has doubled since 1996 and that is now 50% higher than the regenerative capacity of the planet.

The latest population projections suggest that, by 2031, the Northern Ireland population will grow by almost 10%, to just under 2 million.