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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Jan 2020 right left

  
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Wildlife Garden Work

Sunday 5th January
Derryanvil, near Portadown
Free

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Repowering Democracy? Community participation in the energy transition

Thursday 9th January
Canada Room and Council Chamber, Lanyon Building, Queen’s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN

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Scrub Control & Path Work

Sunday 19th January
Balloo Wetland & Woodland Bangor
Free

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BIMcert – Reducing the Energy footprint in the Construction Sector

Wednesday 22nd January
Titanic Belfast Building, 1 Olympic Way, Queen’s Road, Titanic Quarter, Belfast, BT3 9EP
Free

What can your business do to reduce plastic waste?

Thursday 23rd January
Northern Ireland Advanced Composites Engineering Centre, NIACE, Airport Road, Belfast BT3 9DZ

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Environmental Conservation Careers Fair

Tuesday 28th January
School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast

Delivering Sustainable Housing and Communities

Wednesday 29th January
1 Northumberland Avenue, London, WC2N 5BW

Adapting Historic Buildings for Climate Change

Thursday 30th January
Riddel Hall, Queen’s University Belfast, 185 Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5EE

Feeding the City 2020 – Ideation Workshop

Thursday 30th January
Loveworks, Macrory Centre, 130 Duncairn Gardens, Belfast BT15 2GL
Free

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Sustainable development

Sustainable development is wide–ranging and cross–cutting in nature. It is generally defined as ‘development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’.

Sustainable development

Seen as the guiding principle for long–term global development, sustainable development consists of three pillars: economic prosperity, social development and environmental protection.

The Northern Ireland Sustainable Development Strategy was first published in 2006 and later revised in 2010. It sets the overarching agenda for achieving the shared prosperity of Northern Ireland and its people without impacting disproportionately upon our natural environment. Since 2007 District Councils in Northern Ireland are obliged to act in a way that will contribute to the achievement of sustainable development through a statutory duty.

The NI Sustainable Development Plan is outdated and in need of updating.  The emergence of the UN Sustainable Development Goals has revitalised the sustainable development agenda and offers an opportunity for progressing sustainable development policy in NI.

The Sustainable Development Goals

SDGs

At the UN General Assembly on 25 September 2015, Heads of Government from 193 UN Members States gathered to ratify the Sustainable Development Goals. In doing so the international community committed that:

“We resolve, between now and 2030, to end poverty and hunger everywhere; to combat inequalities within and among countries; to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies; to protect human rights and promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls; and to ensure the lasting protection of the planet and its natural resources…”

The SDGs are a common blueprint for a sustainable future – as relevant to communities, households and individuals as they are to governments, businesses, and NGOs.  The SDGs have potential to make a positive impact in Northern Ireland. Sustainable development is a devolved issue and the new outcomes–based approach to the Programme for Government – with its emphasis on well–being – presents us with the opportunity to integrate the global SDGs into local policy making.

The SDGs present a framework for identifying national targets and priorities.  Despite the universal nature of the SDGs, they are sometimes misconstrued as a “developing world issue”.  All participating Nations are required to produce SDG implementation Plans and to take part in national reporting to the UN.

UK Stakeholders for Sustainable Development

SDGs mapped to NI Programme for Government Outcomes & Indicators

Read More

The global population is projected to rise from 7 billion (current) to 9 billion by 2050.

One in five people on this planet, or over 1 billion people, still live in extreme poverty

One in seven people – or 14% of the world’s population is undernourished.

Global demand for natural resources has doubled since 1996 and that is now 50% higher than the regenerative capacity of the planet.

The latest population projections suggest that, by 2031, the Northern Ireland population will grow by almost 10%, to just under 2 million.