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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Jun 2018 right left

    
01

Mid Ulster Vintage Rally

Saturday 2nd June
Springhill, Moneymore
Adult £5, Child £2, Members Free

Car Bazaar

Saturday 2nd June
Mount Stewart
Car £5, Van £30, Trailer £15

03

Scenic Forest Walk

Monday 4th June
Florence Court
Normal Admission, Members Free

05
06
07
08

Portmuck Geology Walk

Saturday 9th June
Portmuck, Co Antrim
No Charge, Donations Welcome

The World of Moths

Sunday 10th June
Murlough NNR
No Charge, Donations Welcome

11

Launch Event – INTERREG VA Collaborative Action for the Natura Network Project (CANN)

Tuesday 12th June
Nuremore Hotel, Carrickmacross, Co. Monaghan
Free

FSC Tollymore Teacher Training

Tuesday 12th June
FSC Tollymore, Co. Down
£40

13
14
15
16

Moyola Waterfoot Nature Reserve – Himalayan Balsam Control

Sunday 17th June
Moyola Waterfoot Nature Reerve
Free

Wild in the Park: Falcons and Friends

Sunday 17th June
Carnfunnock Country Park
Free

International Climate Change Adaptation Conference 2018

Monday 18th June
See website for details
See website for details

19
20
21
22

Specialist Plant Fair

Saturday 23rd June
Mount Stewart
Normal Admission, Members Free

Grass Roots Summer Outing

Saturday 23rd June
Downpatrick Area
TBC

Jazz in the Garden at Mount Stewart

Sunday 24th June
Mount Stewart
Normal Admission, Members Free

25
26
27
28

Fossil Hunting

Friday 29th June
Carrick–a–Rede
No Charge, Donations Welcome

Jump in Muddy Puddles Day

Friday 29th June
Carnfunnock Country Park
Free

Ragwort Challenge

Saturday 30th June
Murlough NNR
No Charge, Donations Welcome

 

Wood Pasture & Parkland Network 24 May 2018

National network publishes series of videos to raise awareness of an ancient and forgotten habitat (via Wood Pasture & Parkland Network)

 

 

The Wood Pasture and Parkland Network (WPPN) is a new national network of organisations working together to promote the value of wood pasture and parkland habitat. This precious, ancient habitat shaped by generations of people working in harmony with nature is home to many endangered species from bats and birds to deadwood insects and fungi. The WPPN shines a spotlight on this forgotten part of our landscape.

The WPPN has produced a series of five short, accessible and informative videos (funded by The Woodland Trust) to raise awareness of this ecologically rich yet overlooked habitat. The videos, available online via www.ptes.org/wppn, introduce the ecological, historical and cultural aspects of wood pasture and parkland, and describe management advice for landowners to help maintain their key features.

Jeremy Dagley, the City of London Corporation’s Head of Conservation at Epping Forest (who also presents the videos) explains: “Wood pasture and parkland habitats combine big old trees and their full spreading crowns with open heaths and grasslands and all other ranges of vegetation in between. Wood pastures are especially rich in ancient and hollowing trees, each of which provides its own wealth of micro–habitats for hundreds of species. Many of these species are entirely dependent on these trees and the more open conditions in which they grow.”

“Trees grow an entirely different shape and structure if they have grown in the open, rather than in dense woodland. This structure makes them better at supporting wildlife and often means that they live a lot longer. These trees often with the help of people harvesting their wood can live out their full life potential. This, in turn, means they provide more of the rare habitat of natural wood decay. The last stages of this decay process are now so uncommon that many of the species that rely on it are at risk of extinction.”

Wood pasture and parkland, such as Epping Forest where parts of these videos were filmed, contain some of the oldest living trees in the country. The decaying wood habitats found across wood pasture sites inside these trees are home to many bats, birds, invertebrates, lichens and fungi. Invertebrates that rely on decaying wood are one of the most threatened ecological groups of invertebrates in Europe and yet are also critical, along with decaying wood fungi, to all wooded ecosystems. In fact, earlier this year the IUCN assessed the status of 700 European beetles that live on decaying wood and found that 18% (a fifth) are at risk of extinction due to a lack of this resource, for which traditional wood pasture and parkland sites are now the most important reserves.

Megan Gimber, Key Habitats Officer at PTES adds: “Wood pasture and parklands are positively teeming with life and are home to numerous rare and endangered species, which is why it’s so vital that they are preserved.

“Unlike other habitats such as ancient woodlands and meadows, there isn’t the public recognition of wood pasture and parkland, and the vital contribution to sustaining our wildlife they provide. Our conservation task is a greater challenge as a result, which is why we made this important series of videos.”

Suzanne Perry, Senior Specialist at Natural England concludes: “Wood pasture and parkland is currently under threat from a variety of factors including climate change, pollution, conversion to commercial forestry and tree disease.”

“Therefore, we are delighted to be involved in this partnership, which will help raise awareness of these special places. Natural England hope this new partnership will also contribute to securing a dynamic future for this incredibly rich and diverse habitat.”

Visit www.ptes.org/wppn to watch the videos and to find out more information about the Wood Pasture and Parkland Network.