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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Mar 2018 right left

   
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Hedge Planting

Sunday 4th March
Gilford Castle, Gilford Village, Co–Armagh
Free

Belfast Festival of Learning

Monday 5th March
Various, see programme for details
Free

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Woodland Management – Saintfield Estate

Sunday 18th March
Saintfield Estate, Saintfield
Free

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The Rivers Trust Spring Conference 2018

Wednesday 21st March
Iveagh House, Saint Stephen’s Green, Dublin
Free

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NI Allotment and Community Garden Forum

Saturday 24th March
MACCA Centre, Omagh

Easter Fun At Monkstown Wood

Saturday 24th March
Monkstown Wood, Newtownabbey
See website for details

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Outdoor Recreation & Your Community

Tuesday 27th March
An Creagán Centre, County Tyrone

EU Funding for Sustainable Development – Project Ideas Lab

Wednesday 28th March
Sustainable NI, Bradford Court, Upper Galwally, Belfast BT8 6RB
Free

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Protecting biodiverse brownfield 6 October 2015

A small proportion of brownfield sites can support very significant biodiversity and also provide the last ‘wild’ spaces in urban areas, allowing access to nature and improving people’s health outcomes…

 

Brownfield-Hub

Untidy Industries brownfield site © Jamie Robins

Redeveloping brownfield land can provide development opportunities and reduce pressures on green belt land and other undeveloped areas, giving opportunities to promote economic regeneration. Planning policy is explicit that brownfield sites should be prioritised for redevelopment provided they are not of ‘high environmental value’.

With Councils across NI currently working on long–term development plans for their areas, but without advice on the interpretation of ‘high environmental value’ in the context of brownfield land, it is possible that some sites could be inappropriately identified for development. In order to avoid possible conflicts between conservation and development, the Wildlife and Countryside Link have developed guidance which we hope gives a useful steer. You can access it here. These wildlife rich sites will usually either meet the criteria for the UK Priority Habitat Open Mosiac Habitat on Previously Developed Land (OMHPDL), or have an existing conservation designation.

Experience has shown that brownfield land meeting the criteria for ‘high environmental value’ will be a small proportion of the total (less than 10%) so this should not be seen as a constraint on economic growth. Councils that have not yet mapped the extent of OMHPDL (Open Mosaic Habitat on Previously Developed Land) within their area should consider doing so.

Buglife, the Invertebrate Conservation Trust, have expertise in brownfield land and now have a presence in Northern Ireland. For further information we recommend taking a look at their online brownfield hub or contacting the Northern Ireland Officer, Adam Mantell, on adam.mantell@buglife.org.uk.