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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Jan 2022 right left

     
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06

Care Farming for Mental Health

Friday 7th January
Online
£50

08
09

DfC Covid Recovery Programme 2022 Information session (1)

Monday 10th January
Online
Free

Weird and wonderful winter moths

Monday 10th January
Online
free for Ulster Wildlife members and £3.00 for non–members

11

DfC Covid Recovery Programme 2022 Information session (2)

Wednesday 12th January
Online
Free

Next steps for decarbonising UK heat and heat networks – expansion, buildings decarbonisation, consumer protection, and policy and regulatory priorities

Thursday 13th January
Online
£190 plus VAT

14
15
16

QUB Winter School: Sustainability Summit

Monday 17th January
Online
Free

SUPER–G project on “Improving Permanent Grasslands for ecosystem services and biodiversity”

Monday 17th January
Online
Free

Sustainable seafood and how you can help

Monday 17th January
Online
free for Ulster Wildlife members and £3.00 for non–members

Environment Ireland

Tuesday 18th January
CROKE PARK, Dublin
See website for details

Sustainable Tourism with Esther Dobbin from The National Trust

Wednesday 19th January
Online
Free

Energy Efficiency in the Home

Wednesday 19th January
Online
Free

Ireland’s Wintering Waterbirds Webinar

Wednesday 19th January
Online
Free

20

HERoNI: 30 years of Historic Environment Record NI , The Story So Far

Friday 21st January
Online
Free

Climate Bar Symposium: Towards a Model Environmental Law (Cóir Dlí an Chomhshaoil)

Friday 21st January
Online
Free– £50

22
23

SUSTx Sustainability Summit & Business Community

Monday 24th January
Online
Free

Leave No Trace Awareness Course (Tollymore)

Tuesday 25th January
Tollymore National Outdoor Centre
£35 / €40

The geodiversity of Northern Ireland: the greatest story of our time

Tuesday 25th January
Online
Free

Climate Change: what it means for Northern Ireland and what we can do

Wednesday 26th January
Online
free for Ulster Wildlife members and £3.00 for non–members

Moved by Nature Big Webinar of Action

Thursday 27th January
Online
Free

Energy Efficiency in the Home

Thursday 27th January
Online
Free

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29
30

Sustainable Carbon Cycles

Monday 31st January
Online

     
 

Powering a Green Recovery 30 November 2021

Head of @RenewableNI, Steven Agnew and Russel Smyth launch the new Powering a Green Recovery report revealing the positive economic impact of wind turbines in Northern Ireland

        

Image via Renewable NI.

A report published today reveals the positive economic impact of wind turbines in Northern Ireland.

Powering A Green Recovery breaks down the £3.1 billion investment onshore wind could generate in Northern Ireland by 2030 if ambitious targets are set, and met.

Commisioned by RenewableNI, the voice of Northern Ireland’s electricity industry, the predicted 2030 figures are based on the 2,500 MW onshore wind capacity outlined in SONI’s Tomorrow’s Energy Scenarios.

During this decade, the sector will boost the economy with:

  • a total GVA of £3.1bn;
  • £195m rates contribution;
  • £63m in labour income per year by 2030;
  • over £31m invested in community benefit schemes.

In predominantly rural locations, wind farms help bring new investment, economic activity and employment throughout the region.

Through onshore wind’s direct and indirect activities and employment, the sector contributed £28 million in wages this year.  This will increase over the decade with up to 1,000 additional jobs being created by 2030.

Rural communities are further boosted by the rates contribution and community benefit schemes created by wind farms.

In 2021, £15m was paid in rates by onshore wind in Northern Ireland, reaching the proposed targets would generate £195million across the decade.

Accounting for more than 10%–15% of a council’s total rates income, wind farms provide a stable revenue source over a long period.  This allows councils to make plans for the decade ahead, investing in the community.

The onshore wind sector’s investment in community benefit schemes will bring a further £4.2m per year to rural areas by 2030.  Explaining community benefit, Head of RenewableNI, Steven Agnew said:

“While the environmental benefits of onshore wind, such as lower emissions and sustainability are well known, there is much less awareness of the social impact.

“The wind industry is supporting local communities, investing in rural Northern Ireland and providing for the future energy demand.  RenewableNI members donated £2.4m to community benefit schemes this year. From supporting small PTA projects and helping deliver food during lockdown, onshore wind can make a big difference to small projects.  There are clear rewards for local communities that host wind farms.

“Renewable electricity can power a green economic recovery for Northern Ireland, especially in rural communities, with guaranteed stable employment.

Powering a Green Economy makes it clear that setting an Energy Strategy with ambitious goals is vital for Northern Ireland’s economic growth as well as limiting the climate crisis.”

Read the full article here.

Powering a Green Recovery is available here.