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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Dec 2021 right left

  

Committing to a veg pledge: a multi–stakeholder initiative to increase vegetable consumption for health and the environment

Wednesday 1st December
Online
Free

Webinar 2: A Bolder Vision for Belfast

Wednesday 1st December
Online
Free

NPA SMARTRENEW RENEWABLE ENERGY PILOT SHOWCASE

Thursday 2nd December
Online
Free

Green Growth Strategy Public Consultation Session 2

Thursday 2nd December
Online
Free

NEA (NI) Energy Efficiency in the Home Information session

Friday 3rd December
Online
Free

Future for Geothermal Energy, NI

Friday 3rd December
Online
Free

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05

#DigitalFundraising Webinar Series 2021

Monday 6th December
Online
Free– members only

Building Digital Capacity in the Voluntary & Community Sector

Monday 6th December
Online
Free– members only

Net Zero Culture

Tuesday 7th December
Online
See ticket types

Irish Geoparks Forum – Climate Change: past, present and future

Tuesday 7th December
Online
Free

AFBI Economics Research Conference

Wednesday 8th December
Online
Free

Climate and Biodiversity Ambition: Shared Island as a Catalyst

Wednesday 8th December
Online
Free

Responses to challenging visitor pressures and behaviours

Wednesday 8th December
Online
Free for ORN members and £20.00 for non–members

Green Growth Strategy Public Consultation Session 3

Wednesday 8th December
Online
Free

Brexit: A Year in Food, Farming & Agriculture

Thursday 9th December
Online
Free

What have hedgerows ever done for us? (And what we can do for them in return)

Thursday 9th December
Online
Free

Water Framework Directive Statistics Report Webinar

Friday 10th December
Online
Free

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12

Draft Green Growth Strategy for NI – Information Session

Monday 13th December
Online
Free– members only

Green Growth Strategy Public Consultation Session 4

Tuesday 14th December
Online
Free

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Nature Recovery Networks for NI 23 November 2021

Putting Nature into Recovery in Northern Ireland

 

 

To effectively address the nature and climate crises in Northern Ireland, and to contribute towards global goals, we need a transformative step–change in how we do things and to move towards effectively managing and actively restoring nature and at a landscape scale. One of the key actions needed is creating More, Bigger, Better and more Joined–up spaces for nature, through what we call Nature Recovery Networks (or NRNs in short), as was recently recognised by the UK’s five statutory nature conservation bodies’ Nature–Positive 2030–report.

The Landscape Partnership (Ulster Wildlife, RSPB NI, Woodland Trust and National Trust) is currently coordinating a project, funded by the National Heritage Lottery Fund, to build capacity to deliver Nature Recovery Networks in Northern Ireland and they have today launched a suite of briefing documents (you can find them here) to introduce the sector and the wider public to the concept and what needs to happen to make them a reality in Northern Ireland.

Nina Schönberg, the Nature Recovery Networks Project Coordinator explains:

“These briefing documents come at an important time for our Nature and Climate. Not only are there big global conferences underway and coming up, but as Northern Ireland prepares its Climate Change Bill and future strategies to protect its environment, we need to ensure that nature’s recovery, and nature–based solutions, play an integral part in these. To a large extent we know what we need to do and how to do it. We believe that the outputs of this project, such as the habitat network maps, should contribute towards the evidence–base for action, to ensure the right action is taken in the right places.”

“NRNs represent a strategic, long–term approach to managing, creating, restoring, and enhancing habitats and landscapes, linking together ecological processes across protected areas and the wider landscape, while highlighting the link between the status of our natural world and human well–being. To make NRNs a reality in Northern Ireland, they need to be supported and coordinated from the top. This means bringing together expertise, creating a statutory requirement for nature’s recovery and climate change, and supporting this through long–term funding.”

Read the full blog post here