Cookie Policy

We use cookies to make our website effective and useful for you. To continue, please accept the use of cookies.

I accept

How we use cookies

Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Feb 2021 right left

01

The Economics of Biodiversity: the Dasgupta Review

Tuesday 2nd February
Online
Free

Covid 19 – Learning from Belfast – Creating healthy places

Wednesday 3rd February
Online
Free

04
05
06
07
08

Northern Ireland Food, Farm and Land Convention

Tuesday 9th February
Online

Building Soil Fertility on Farm

Wednesday 10th February
Online

Managing Plastic Waste Digital Conference

Thursday 11th February
Online
£200 – £260 + VAT

12
13
14

The Protocol and the Environment

Monday 15th February
Online
Free

16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

FFCC’s Changing our land management

Wednesday 24th February
Online
Free

Global Soil Biodiversity Initiative Speaks: Targeting, Monitoring, and Conserving Soil Biodiversity: Soil biodiversity observation networks across the globe

Wednesday 24th February
Online
Free

Priorities for moving forward low carbon heat in the UK – strategy, policy, regulation, and supporting delivery

Thursday 25th February
Online
£190 plus VAT

Digital Fundraising (CFNI)

Thursday 25th February
Online
Free

Webinar: Integrated home renovation services in Europe

Friday 26th February
Online
Free

RSPB NI: Saving Species & Combatting Climate Change

Saturday 27th February
Online
Free

28
      
 

Natural Capital on Farmland 22 February 2021

MINISTER OF STATE PIPPA HACKETT WELCOMES VIDEO ON HOW THE NATURAL CAPITAL APPROACH CAN BENEFIT FARMERS AND PLANET

 

Image via Natural Capital Ireland

Minister of State Pippa Hackett has welcomed the release of a new animated video, produced by Natural Capital Ireland in partnership with the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, to introduce the concept of Natural Capital Accounting to the farming community and agri–food industry.

This lively animated video shows how the Natural Capital approach – a standardised method to assess nature’s stocks and flows – can help us all to consider the hidden economic and environmental value in a farm. This can include soil health, biodiversity, carbon storage, water quality and flood mitigation, as well as cultural and heritage value, mental health and wellbeing.

Referring to the approach, Minister Hackett said: “I look forward to a time when we all speak easily about Natural Capital. The services nature provides are so widespread and so important that we should be recognising them almost without thinking. And we must start accounting for them too. There is quite a distance to go, of course, before we get to that stage, which is why videos like this one, which help us get comfortable with the concept, are so valuable.”

The farming families of Ireland can be powerful allies for nature conservation. Responsible for so much of Ireland’s land management, farmers are on the frontline when it comes to tackling the biodiversity crisis, especially armed with the right knowledge and support.

The European Green Deal states that “all EU policies should contribute to preserving and restoring Europe’s natural capital” and the new EU Biodiversity Strategy states that by 2050, “the EU’s natural capital will be protected, valued and appropriately restored”.

As this approach becomes more integrated into national policy, it will allow farmers, policymakers, ecologists, and the wider community to work together to make more sustainable practices the norm and will illustrate how often simple measures and adjustments regarding

land use, pesticide use, hedge–cutting practices etc can be of enormous short–term and long–term benefit for the planet, with the potential for economic advantages for the farmer too.

Chair of the Board of Natural Capital Ireland, Professor Jane Stout from Trinity College Dublin, said: “There’s lots of unrecognised and overlooked value in Irish farmland. Both in terms of the natural capital it supports, and the ecosystem services and benefits that flow from it. Quantifying that natural capital, including biodiversity of habitats and species, and the service flows from them, and tracking it over time in Natural Capital Accounts, can be a useful tool for farmers and policymakers. These accounts can help inform decision–making and planning, as well as developing incentives to protect and restore nature on farmland.”

You can view the video at this link here