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News

 

Events

 

Apr 2018 right left

      
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Coppicing Small Trees

Sunday 8th April
Knockbracken Allotments, South Belfast
Free

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10

Integrated Water Management and Sustainable Drainage

Wednesday 11th April
QUB, Medical Biology Centre, Lecture Room 2, Ground Floor, Lisburn Road, Belfast
Free

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13

Our Earth, Our Future: to mine or to mind?

Saturday 14th April
Greenvale Hotel & Restaurant, 57 Drum Road, Cookstown, Co. Tyrone
See website for details

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Path Maintenance

Sunday 22nd April
Bog Meadows Nature Reserve Belfast
Free

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Making Mitigation Work

Thursday 26th April
Red Cow Moran Hotel, Dublin
£45 – £160

LIFE Information Day – Dublin

Friday 27th April
Dublin
Free

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Nations lack invasives capacity 24 August 2016

Most countries in the world have little capacity to deal effectively with invasive species, a study suggests (via BBC News)

 

crayfish

 

The spread of non–native species threatens livelihoods and biodiversity, but the issue is worsened by global trade, travel and climate change.

Writing in Nature Communications journal, and international team forecast how the spread of species could change over the 21st Century.

They show that one–sixth of the world’s land surface is vulnerable to invasion.

In what the authors say is the first evaluation of its kind, the paper assesses individual nations’ abilities to manage existing invasive species and respond to new ones.

Regan Early from the University of Exeter, Jeffrey Dukes from Purdue University in the US and other co–authors suggest that developed countries, which have been most affected by invasive species – and have the strongest management efforts – will continue to face an onslaught of new arrivals.

However, they predict that non–native plants, animals and microbes will increasingly threaten developing countries with some of the last remaining biodiversity hotspots, due to increased air travel and the expansion of agriculture.

Read more via BBC News…