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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Jan 2018 right left

New Year’s Day Winter Walk

Monday 1st January
Mount Stewart
Adult £10, Child £5

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Historic Garden Restoration

Sunday 7th January
Gilford Castle, Gilford Village, Co Armagh
Free

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Have a go: Hedge laying

Saturday 20th January
Mount Stewart
No Charge, Donations Welcome

Meadow Management

Sunday 21st January
Balloo Wetland & Woodland, Bangor
Free

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Action Renewables Energy Association (AREA) – The Opportunities in Energy Storage

Tuesday 23rd January
The Doyen, 829 Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7GY
£66

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Griddle Baking

Saturday 27th January
Rowallane Garden
Normal Admission, Members Free

Get Stuck In at Murlough

Sunday 28th January
Murlough NNR
No Charge, Donations Welcome

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NI litter highlighted in report 8 December 2014

More than one in seven streets and parks across Northern Ireland have failed to meet acceptable standards for litter, according to Keep Northern Ireland Beautiful

 

BBC

 

Keep Northern Ireland Beautiful also found that only 3% of the places surveyed were litter free.

Of the 2,040 sites surveyed in 2013, 315 had unacceptably high levels of litter and/or dog fouling.

Cigarette butts were the most common type of litter.

The next most common type of litter was confectionary and items from drinks, such as bottle tops or tin cans.

Dr Ian Humphreys, chief executive at Keep Northern Ireland Beautiful, said: “The survey gives us great insights into littering trends and what is very clear is that we need to inspire people across Northern Ireland to reflect on their littering habits and take action and responsibility to take pride in the places they live in and love.”

The report compared littering across different land–uses and found that rural areas were more than four times more likely to be heavily affected by litter than urban areas.

Every type of litter observed in the survey was less frequent in lower density residential areas compared to higher density residential areas.

For example, takeaway packaging, drinks containers and non–packaging litter were all recorded about twice as often.

Read more…