Cookie Policy

We use cookies to make our website effective and useful for you. To continue, please accept the use of cookies.

I accept

How we use cookies

Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

     

    Jul 2020 right left

      
    01
    02
    03
    04
    05
    06

    Energy Efficiency in Business

    Tuesday 7th July
    Online
    Free

    08
    09
    10
    11
    12
    13
    14
    15
    16
    17
    18
    19
    20
    21
    22
    23
    24
    25
    26
    27
    28
    29
    30
    31
     
     

    NI charities face funding crisis 1 April 2020

    Northern Ireland’s charities and social enterprises have appealed to government and the general public to help them survive with many facing financial meltdown because of the Covid–19 pandemic

    (via Chief Officers 3rd Sector)

    Traditional fund–raising has dried up with the closure of charity shops, childcare centres and cafes and the enforced cancellation of sponsored events from marathons to coffee mornings.

    It has been estimated that across the UK these losses will amount to £4.3 billion over the next 12 weeks.

    Nora Smith Chief Executive of CO3 which represents charity bosses said: “Charities exist to protect the most vulnerable people in society, so when we struggle it is harder to help them, and when charities close down those that so desperately need them go without.”

    CO3 is one of a group of charitable representative bodies including Social Enterprise N (SENI), the Rural Community Network (RCN), the Community Fund for NI and Northern Ireland Environment Link (NIEL) that is calling for Stormont to step in.

    Colin Jess at SENI highlighted “The Scottish government has set up a £20 million Resilience Fund to help charities. Wales have just announced a £500 million fund, and the Department for Communities has pledged a support fund here. We need a similar financial support programme for charities and social enterprises”. 

    Kate Clifford from RCN said: “These are desperate times and nobody wants to see organisations that do such good work go to the wall. The Communities Minister has taken a strong, positive stance and we need the rest of government to follow. ”

    The impact across Northern Ireland has been devastating for charities and the many thousands who depend on them. Community centres which are such a vital hub have been closed. Face to face sessions for older people, those who need counseling and youth services cannot operate and those charities offering food banks are facing shortages. The entire arts section has shut down.

    Andrew McCracken with CFNI commented “We’re all doing the best we can. Where we can’t work face to face with people we’re offering online and telephone support. However, many of the most vulnerable people don’t have access to the internet.”

    Craig McGuicken at NIEL added “Many charities now face severe cash flow problems. Their funding is drying up – and where it does exist we need funders to be flexible and help us to offer support to vulnerable people and places in different ways. Collectively charities employ 45,000 people in Northern Ireland making the Third Sector an important but too often neglected sector in the economy. We must be helped to survive.”

     “The one bright light in these dark times has been the astonishing response of the general public to the pandemic. There has been a remarkable resurgence of kindness everywhere. There are signs that we will emerge from this with a stronger community spirit. In the meantime please let’s make sure that our great charities survive.”

    ENDS