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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Oct 2021 right left

    

World People Of Nature Day– Green Childhood

Friday 1st October
Online

Winter Migration Festival

Saturday 2nd October
Castle Espie
See event page

03
04

BITCI– The Sustainability Revolution

Tuesday 5th October
Online
Free

Natural Capital Finance & Investment Conference 2021

Wednesday 6th October
Online
Delegate places are £55 per person

Peatlands gathering 2021

Thursday 7th October
Online
Free

08
09
10

One World Festival

Monday 11th October
Mostly online

Do no harm to the environment: translating the EGD into Cohesion Policy 2021–2027

Tuesday 12th October
Online
Free

Rising seas and climate change with Dr Asha de Vos

Tuesday 12th October
Online
Free

Heritage on the Ground

Tuesday 12th October
Online
Free

Sustainable Peatlands: A Win for All

Wednesday 13th October
Online
Free

Natura 2000 logo for goods and services – supporting nature and people for a sustainable recovery

Wednesday 13th October
Online
Free

Floodplain Meadows Partnership Conference 2021

Wednesday 13th October
Online
0–£25

NI Waste Expo 2021

Thursday 14th October
Titanic Belfast
Non–qualified individuals are subject to a £250 attendance cost.

NorthernIreland2035– Common Purpose

Thursday 14th October
Online
Free

15

Cave Hill Fungal Foray

Saturday 16th October
Belfast Castle
Free

17

“The Climate Crisis is a Human Rights Crisis”

Monday 18th October
Online
Free

Nature Means Business Online Conference

Tuesday 19th October
Online
£5.98

Nature Means Business

Tuesday 19th October
Online
£5.98

Practicing Food Sovereignty in the Climate Emergency

Tuesday 19th October
Online
Free

Young Trustees in the Environmental Sector

Tuesday 19th October
Online
Free

Mapping a Just Energy Transition in NI

Wednesday 20th October
QUB Great Hall
Free

The Year of Youth Climate Action: COP26 and Your Role

Wednesday 20th October
Online
Free

Legislating for Climate Action on the Island of Ireland

Thursday 21st October
Online
Free

22
23
24

Just Zero – a Virtual Conference on Financing the Just Transition

Monday 25th October
Online
Free

26

Agriculture and Climate Change: A Countryside COP event

Wednesday 27th October
Online
Free

Climate Resilience Heritage Summit

Wednesday 27th October
Online
Free

28
29
30

UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) – Glasgow 2021

Sunday 31st October
Glasgow

      
 

NI Butterfly Decline 11 October 2021

Big Butterfly Count 2021 sees lowest ever number of butterflies recorded

 

Wildlife charity warns that we must act now if we are to save the UK’s butterflies and moths for future generations.

Butterfly Conservation has today released data on the number of butterflies and day–flying moths counted across the UK in this year’s Big Butterfly Count, which ran from 16th July – 8th August.

Worryingly, the decline in the number of butterflies and moths across the UK is continuing, with the overall number of butterflies recorded per count at its lowest level since the Big Butterfly Count began 12 years ago.

The nation’s love of butterflies isn’t diminishing. Despite the low butterfly numbers, and relatively poor weather, more butterfly counts were submitted than ever before. Over 150,000 counts were registered, representing more than 38,000 hours of butterfly counting in gardens, parks and the countryside.

Dr Zoë Randle, Senior Surveys Officer at Butterfly Conservation said: “This year’s results show that the average number of butterflies and moths per count is the lowest we’ve recorded so far. On average people counted nine butterflies or moths per count, which is down from 11 in 2020, and down again from 16 in 2019. More counts are undertaken and submitted year on year, but it seems that there are fewer butterflies and moths around to be counted.”

 Some of the UK’s most–loved species including the Small Tortoiseshell and Peacock butterflies dropped in numbers this summer. The iconic Peacock butterfly suffered its lowest numbers since 2012. The Small Tortoiseshell, once a frequent visitor to gardens in the UK, had its third worst summer in the history of the Big Butterfly Count and shows a significant long–term decline in Britain.

Read full article here.