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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Dec 2021 right left

  

Committing to a veg pledge: a multi–stakeholder initiative to increase vegetable consumption for health and the environment

Wednesday 1st December
Online
Free

Webinar 2: A Bolder Vision for Belfast

Wednesday 1st December
Online
Free

NPA SMARTRENEW RENEWABLE ENERGY PILOT SHOWCASE

Thursday 2nd December
Online
Free

Green Growth Strategy Public Consultation Session 2

Thursday 2nd December
Online
Free

NEA (NI) Energy Efficiency in the Home Information session

Friday 3rd December
Online
Free

Future for Geothermal Energy, NI

Friday 3rd December
Online
Free

04
05

#DigitalFundraising Webinar Series 2021

Monday 6th December
Online
Free– members only

Building Digital Capacity in the Voluntary & Community Sector

Monday 6th December
Online
Free– members only

Net Zero Culture

Tuesday 7th December
Online
See ticket types

Irish Geoparks Forum – Climate Change: past, present and future

Tuesday 7th December
Online
Free

AFBI Economics Research Conference

Wednesday 8th December
Online
Free

Climate and Biodiversity Ambition: Shared Island as a Catalyst

Wednesday 8th December
Online
Free

Responses to challenging visitor pressures and behaviours

Wednesday 8th December
Online
Free for ORN members and £20.00 for non–members

Green Growth Strategy Public Consultation Session 3

Wednesday 8th December
Online
Free

Brexit: A Year in Food, Farming & Agriculture

Thursday 9th December
Online
Free

What have hedgerows ever done for us? (And what we can do for them in return)

Thursday 9th December
Online
Free

Water Framework Directive Statistics Report Webinar

Friday 10th December
Online
Free

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12

Draft Green Growth Strategy for NI – Information Session

Monday 13th December
Online
Free– members only

Green Growth Strategy Public Consultation Session 4

Tuesday 14th December
Online
Free

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NI Peatland Map 18 October 2021

Ulster Wildlife: Saving our peatlands through partnership: A new peatland map for NI

 

Peatlands are one of our climate heroes and we need to look after them.  As we gear up and transform our efforts to tackle climate change for the long term, taking action to protect peatlands is being recognised by governments, landowners, environmentalists, and citizens.  Ulster Wildlife highlights the value of partnerships in taking action. 

Climate change is being talked about much more, especially as we near the critical decision–making United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) COP26, in Glasgow this November.  Many of us may wonder what we can do to help prepare and adapt to the changes caused by climate change and how to prevent these from becoming worse for us and, most importantly, for future generations.  One way is to give peat a chance.

Peatlands in Northern Ireland occupy 242,600 hectares, covering 18% of the land area – that’s around 21 times the area of Belfast City.  Many of us regularly see peatlands, also known as peat bogs, perhaps taking them for granted and not realising how much we rely on them for our way of life.  Peatlands have been forming for thousands of years and are valuable for many reasons.  For generations they have provided land for livestock farming, feeding us and supporting our economy.  Healthy peatlands are naturally wet places and in the uplands they capture rainfall, controlling its steady flow downhill, averting flooding, supplying clean water into rivers and into drinking water reservoirs, and can reduce the risk of wildfires during prolonged dry weather.  They are places rich in nature, hosting many rare and protected species.  

The challenge is that in Northern Ireland around 80% of our peatlands are leaking greenhouse gases and we urgently need to restore them so we can stop this, and it needs to be done on a large scale, and as quickly as possible.

And they have a critical role in our efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere.  Peatland plants draw carbon dioxide from the atmosphere using it for growth and as the older parts of the plants die back they slowly turn into carbon–rich peat, locking away the carbon for thousands of years more.  It’s a massive amount of carbon – in Northern Ireland, around 45 years–worth of our current annual greenhouse gas emissions is locked away. 

Read the full press release here.