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News

 

Events

 

Sep 2021 right left

  
01

Biocultural Heritage in the UK – Report Launch

Thursday 2nd September
Online
Free

Belfast Agenda: Continuing the Conversation in South Belfast

Thursday 2nd September
Online
Free

03
04
05

European Heritage Open Days 2021

Monday 6th September
Various, throughout NI
Free

Belfast Agenda: Continuing the Conversation in North Belfast

Tuesday 7th September
Online
Free

08

Belfast Agenda: Continuing the Conversation in West Belfast

Thursday 9th September
Online
Free

10
11
12
13
14
15

Belfast Agenda: Continuing the Conversation in East Belfast

Thursday 16th September
Online
Free

All–Ireland Pollinator Plan Public Webinar

Friday 17th September
Online
Free

18

Climate Craic – NI Climate Festival

Sunday 19th September
TBC
Free

Belfast Agenda: Continuing the Conversation with Communities of Interest

Monday 20th September
Online
Free

Rural Community Pollinator Grants Online Info Session

Tuesday 21st September
Online
Free

The 5 Fs : How you can help the climate crisis

Wednesday 22nd September
Online
Free

Handiheat Final Conference 2021

Wednesday 22nd September
Online
Free

Rural Community Network

Thursday 23rd September
Online
Free

24
25
26
27
28

Net Zero Festival 2021

Wednesday 29th September
Online
Free

We need to keep talking about digital

Thursday 30th September
Online
Free

  
 

Green energy: NI’s power grid 8 March 2021

Green energy: Options for doubling renewable energy on NI’s power grid

 

Conor Macauley via BBC News NI

The operator of NI’s electricity network has suggested four options for doubling the amount of renewable power on the grid.

 

SONI said the network needs investment in the hundreds of millions to cope with increased demand for green energy as NI tries to hit carbon targets.

 

The demand is likely to be driven by much higher uptake of electric vehicles and the electrification of heat.

The cost of the investment will be paid through customers’ electricity bills.

One of the biggest problems is that much renewable energy – mainly wind farms – is in the north and west, while most of the power is consumed in the east of Northern Ireland.

About half our power already comes from renewables but there is a stated ambition to get that to 70% by 2030.

For that to happen, the amount of renewable energy on the network would have to almost double.

That presents major challenges for the electricity network due to the nature of renewable power and the capacity of the grid to deliver it.

  • NI ‘should cut carbon emissions by 82% by 2050’
  • UK’s 68% climate change target a ‘huge challenge’

The four approaches suggested include using policy to concentrate renewable generation in areas where the grid is strong.

Other options include continuing to offer grid connections where generators choose to site renewable projects and using technology to transfer power from west to east.

The final suggestion is that the executive incentivises power–hungry data centres and other big industry to locate close to renewable sources.

SONI says only two of the options – concentrating renewable connections at grid strong–points and encouraging big business to locate near renewable sources – will guarantee Northern Ireland meets a 70% target.

Read the full article here.