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Aug 2021 right left

      
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Advising for Sustainable Food Production as an Island

Monday 16th August
Online
Free

Open Local Government: South–West NI Workshop

Tuesday 17th August
Online
Free

18

Open Local Government: Ards & North Down and Lisburn & Castlereagh Workshop

Thursday 19th August
Online
Free

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Open Local Government: North–East NI Workshop

Tuesday 24th August
Online
Free

25

Open Local Government: South–East NI Workshop

Thursday 26th August
Online
Free

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Cull “completely unacceptable” 19 July 2021

Charities consider proposed badger cull completely unacceptable

(via Ulster Wildlife)

 

Badger

Image via Pixabay

The launch of a consultation on the bovine TB eradication strategy has left local charities extremely disappointed and shocked with government proposals relating to a proposed badger cull

Following the launch of the consultation by the Department for Agriculture, Environment & Rural Affairs (DAERA) on their ‘Next Steps of the Btb Eradication Strategy for Northern Ireland’, leading Northern Ireland charities, Ulster Wildlife, USPCA and the Woodland Trust, whilst supporting many of the measures designed to combat the disease, are strongly opposing the proposed culling of healthy badgers. 

Ken Brundle, Chairman of Ulster Wildlife Trust said:

“We are extremely shocked and disappointed that more ethical alternatives, such as badger vaccination and ‘Test, Vaccinate or Remove’ (TVR) approaches have not been proposed, despite the positive results from DAERA’s pilot study. The consultation proposals involve farmers shooting large numbers of predominantly healthy badgers within the cull zones, with no guarantee of a lasting reduction in Bovine TB, and whilst we recognise the significant implications of Bovine TB for the farming community, this is completely unacceptable.”

Brendan Mullan, Chief Executive of the USPCA stated:

“The USPCA recognises the trauma and suffering caused at a basic human level on farms affected by bovine TB not to mention the cost of almost £40m per year spent in tackling the disease; and so we need to come up with a new but more importantly – an effective strategy to eradicate the disease. Across Northern Ireland there will be working farms with badgers on them and no sign of TB in the farm livestock – so quite simply – badgers are not the cause of TB in cattle. Research shows that 8 out 10 badgers are healthy and there is therefore no justification for an indiscriminate cull of badgers in Northern Ireland. The slaughter of healthy badgers as outlined in this consultation document is unjustifiable and morally wrong. If a wildlife intervention is to be part of the strategy, it should follow a test, vaccinate or remove approach, which has been shown by DAERA’s own research project to be effective.”

A widespread badger cull approach has been adopted in England and the Republic of Ireland.  However, it has proved to be a very contentious and divisive policy that is widely opposed by the public, academics, environmentalists, animal welfare and animal rights organisations.

Despite the cull in England, national herd incidence and the prevalence of bovine TB has increased slightly in the 12 months ending 31 March 2021. In 2019, after five years of culling, significant increases in bTB occurred in cattle within two of the original cull areas; Gloucestershire and Somerset. More than 140,000 badgers have been killed in England since 2013, causing a public outcry. DEFRA has recently announced that new culling licenses are to be banned after 2022.

Read more via Ulster Wildlife…