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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Apr 2019 right left

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Harper’s Yard Repair Cafe

Saturday 6th April
Ormeau Park Bowling Club, Belfast

Kilmacrew House, near Banbridge – Hedge Maintenance

Sunday 7th April
Kilmacrew House near Banbridge
Free

A Long–term Environment Plan for Northern Ireland

Monday 8th April
Belmont Tower, 82 Belmont Church Road, Belfast BT4 3FG
Free

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Would an Institute for Detectorists aid revision of The Treasure Act & implementation of The Valetta Convention?

Saturday 13th April
UCL Institute of Archaeology, 31–4 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY
Free

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People, Planet, Prosperity, Peace and Partnership: Delivering the UN Sustainable Development Goals – What Role for the NI Voluntary & Community Sector?

Thursday 18th April
61 Duncairn Gardens, Belfast BT15 2GB
Free

All–Island Environmental Governance post–Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement

Thursday 18th April
Canada Room and Council Chamber, Lanyon Building, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN
Free

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Derryanvil near Portadown – Planting Young Trees

Saturday 20th April
Derryanvil near Portadown
Free

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Easter Monday Family Fun Day & Craft Fair

Monday 22nd April
Florence Court
Normal Admission

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Slievenacloy Nature Reserve, Belfast Hills – Scrub Clearance

Sunday 28th April
Slievenacloy Nature Reserve, Belfast Hills
Free

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Belfast sculpture takes root 22 November 2018

Belfast sculpture takes root for trees – A modern–day tree charter represented by new sculpture (via The Woodland Trust)


MichaelCooper

Photo by Michael Cooper

A new 15–foot–high sculpture of solid oak has been unveiled at the Woodland Trust’s Friends of Belvoir Wood in south Belfast.

The crafty creation is one of 11 handcrafted poles, by woodcarver Simon Clements, situated at sites across the UK. The sculptures are a physical and permanent legacy of the Charter for Trees, Woods and People, launched in November last year. 

The Charter for Trees, Woods and People was inspired by the original medieval Charter of the Forest, which – some 800 years ago – reinstated the rights of everyday folk to access the Royal Forests. Livelihoods depended upon the all–important opportunity to graze livestock, forage for food and collect firewood.

Today’s charter, with the importance of trees and woodland still firmly at the core, is the handiwork of conservation charity the Woodland Trust, with input from over 70 other organisations.

More than 60,000 tree stories were shared by members of the public, demonstrating the importance of trees to the individual. The recurring sentiments, such as the need for increased protection for our natural heritage, were used to form the 10 principles of the charter.

Northern Ireland’s charter pole represents the theme of planning – the importance of planning greener local landscapes.  A short poem and woodland images twist around the pole. The carefully chosen words were inspired by artist Christine Mackey.

Read the full press release here…