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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Mar 2018 right left

   
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Hedge Planting

Sunday 4th March
Gilford Castle, Gilford Village, Co–Armagh
Free

Belfast Festival of Learning

Monday 5th March
Various, see programme for details
Free

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Woodland Management – Saintfield Estate

Sunday 18th March
Saintfield Estate, Saintfield
Free

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The Rivers Trust Spring Conference 2018

Wednesday 21st March
Iveagh House, Saint Stephen’s Green, Dublin
Free

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23

NI Allotment and Community Garden Forum

Saturday 24th March
MACCA Centre, Omagh

Easter Fun At Monkstown Wood

Saturday 24th March
Monkstown Wood, Newtownabbey
See website for details

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Outdoor Recreation & Your Community

Tuesday 27th March
An Creagán Centre, County Tyrone

EU Funding for Sustainable Development – Project Ideas Lab

Wednesday 28th March
Sustainable NI, Bradford Court, Upper Galwally, Belfast BT8 6RB
Free

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£2.9m for Lough Erne’s heritage 2 November 2015

The unique beauty of County Fermanagh’s lakelands is to benefit from a £2.9m lottery grant to improve wildlife habitats and conserve historical sites

 

BBC

 

The Heritage Lottery Fund grant will go to the Lough Erne Landscape Partnership that is led by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB).

It will be used to preserve wildlife species and habitats and better manage a 500 sq km area of the lakelands.

The project also aims to protect the area’s 100 scheduled monuments.

Many of those are neglected, in serious disrepair and all but forgotten.

New paths, bird hides and camp sites will be provided to give better access to Lough Erne, and there will be festivals, exploring days and events to celebrate the landscape and its extraordinary history.

Protecting

The area is also an important breeding ground for wading birds, such as curlew, snipe and lapwing, whose populations have seen a catastrophic decrease of 83% in the last 30 years.

That problem will be addressed by better land management, tackling invasive species that devastate native plant and animal life, and restoring ancient woodlands and hedgerows.

Read more via BBC News…