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Northern Ireland Environment Link Logo
 

News

 

Events

 

Aug 2019 right left

   
01

CEDaR Training Course – Lake Habitats

Friday 2nd August
Blessingbourne Estate

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Inishowen, County Donegal – Drystone Walling

Friday 9th August
Inishowen, County Donegal
TBC

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CEDaR Training Course – Invasive Species

Wednesday 21st August
Cultra Manor, UFTM

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NMNI-logo SLUG

Leaving the EU will be one of the most defining events for farming and our environment in living memory. It provides an unprecedented opportunity to revitalise our countryside in a way that balances the needs of everyone, for generations to come.

Much of NI’s landscape is rural. Over 70% of the land area is dedicated to agriculture, with approximately 25,000 farms and nearly 50,000 farmers and farm workers. The agri–food industry, including those involved in the supply chain and processors, employs upwards of 100 000 people making it hugely important for NI. Nature Matters NI believes that the Common Agriculture Policy (CAP) has driven agriculture down an unsustainable path, with many of the declines in our natural capital (clean air, water, soil and biodiversity) attributed to agricultural intensification. However, sustainable agriculture can be part of the solution and Brexit poses a once in a generation opportunity to set agriculture on a sustainable footing.

Nature Matters NI is calling for:

  • Public funding for an agricultural support system that includes different incentives that will ensure a sustainable farming industry which rewards farmers and land managers fairly for the environmental services they provide to society, such as; healthy soils, clean water, thriving wildlife and climate change mitigation.
  • A common framework for agriculture in the UK to achieve sustainable management of shared natural resources and address trans–boundary issues such as; climate change and biodiversity conservation, and ensure that the UK Government can meet international environmental obligations to which it is committed.
  • Devolved administrations must be involved in developing the framework. Flexibility within the framework is required so that local priorities can be taken into account.        
  • A strong legislative baseline for environmental legislation. Many of the rules that govern the way we manage our natural resources are derived from EU legislation, which has been good for the environment in the UK. We want to keep these laws to create a solid basis from which to build, working towards environmental standards that are stronger than they are now.
  • A clearly defined transition period in order to provide certainty and stability for farmers and land managers. They need clarity on the duration of a transition period to allow them to plan for the future.

We need new nature friendly agriculture legislation that will enable farmers and nature to thrive together, creating a countryside that is both productive and bursting with wildlife. This animation explains why this needs to happen in Northern Ireland: